#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger – Sarah Zama @JazzFeathers

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Today’s #FabulousFridayGuestBlogger is Sarah Zama. So nice to have her here, and I know you’ll enjoy her post. Welcome, Sarah!



Jazz, a vision of the future with roots in the past

Since the very beginning, jazz had a strong borderline nature, one that would bring different elements together while still creating a division.

The very nature of jazz is a mishmash of different experiences. There is no doubt that jazz has strong roots in the African cultures and probably came out of the slave experience in a time when slavery no longer existed but was still very much remembered. In and around New Orleans, where jazz probably originated, fields songs that came from African traditional cultures mixed with a more European conception of music and especially with instruments coming from it. Jazz was in part both of them, while still being a completely new way not only of making music but also of understanding it. Continue reading

#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger – @CynthiaSReyes – Cynthia Reyes



Today’s guest blogger is Cynthia Reyes, who has a wonderful story of recovery and hope to share with you. I know you’ll enjoy her inspiring post, and will remember to share far and wide.  Now, here’s Cynthia.


The other day, I turned to my husband and said:

“I’d like my life back. The lost years … I’d like them back.”

I thought I’d fully accepted the lost years – the decade that followed a car accident. But the words erupted from my chest before I’d had a chance to even think them through.

My husband had helped me stay on the road to acceptance. But this time, his reply surprised me.

“I know what you mean,” he said softly. “Back when you were strong and vigorous and could do almost anything, it seemed. I miss that woman at times too.”

He got it exactly right. It wasn’t the award-winning career I missed, the many trips abroad, the fact that some people saw me as a visionary leader. It was the ability to do simple things, like dig a new garden bed, go for a long walk, or dance with my husband. Mourning those losses had compounded them. Continue reading

#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger Janet Gogerty

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Today’s guest blogger is a new follower here at The Write Stuff, and I’m looking forward to getting to know her better.  Hope you are, too. Here’s Janet Gogerty to share a bit ab0ut herself and her writing with you, and I hope you’ll pass it along to your friends and followers. Thanks for joining us here today, Janet.


A little while ago we were searching in the loft for something completely different and I came across a box of notebooks. My teenage self had read that would be writers should write; anything and everything; diary, poetry, descriptions, feelings….

Each notebook had the first few pages diligently filled, the rest in their virgin state. But one was different; twelve pages of my first novel, neatly written with no crossings out. I recalled my twenty year old self having a vivid dream that inspired me to start writing the very next day….

I never got any further and it was many years before I started writing seriously. When I joined a writing group we had to write and read out a new piece each week; short stories tumbled onto the page, but when our tutor suggested I start a novel, so my characters had a chance to develop, I felt I had no big idea. My husband suggested I write about my family’s experience emigrating to Australia; this idea became ‘Quarter Acre Block’ and if you want a safe gentle read stop here.

If you like reading something meatier and stranger; if you enjoy tackling Life’s big questions, read on.

My daughter wanted to know what happened to Emma, whose fate was literally left in the air, at the end of a short story ‘Brief Encounters of the Third Kind’. And so I started writing my first novel. What happens to ordinary people when the extraordinary happens to them? The first thing that happens, especially if they are English? They don’t tell anyone, they doubt they will be believed and the longer they keep their dreadful secret to themselves, the harder it becomes. Susan Dexter lives in Ashley, a suburb of London where nothing much happens until the day she is hanging out her washing. For thirty years Susan fears her daughter Emma is not human; then new events lead her to meet others seeking the truth.

This novel evolved into the ‘Brief Encounters Trilogy’. In ‘Three Ages of Man’ a character who walked into the first novel uninvited tells his own very different story. ‘Lives of Anna Alsop’ follows on from the first two novels. Anna was another unexpected character and she narrates the third book.

Meanwhile in real life I’m currently writing a new novel ‘At The Seaside Nobody Hears You Scream’. I also still enjoy penning short stories; some have been published in anthologies and I have published two collections on Amazon Kindle; ‘Dark and Milk’ and ‘Hallows and Heretics’. My husband provides financial, technical and moral support. When he discovered it cost nothing to publish on Amazon Kindle he was happy to help, expecting we were only going to do one book.

‘Quarter Acre Block’ is not autobiographical, but was inspired by our experiences as ‘Ten Pound Pommies’. I was eleven. At twenty I came back to England on the traditional ‘working holiday’ and I’m still here! So I have lived in some very different places and although I have not yet achieved my ambition to live in a windmill, lighthouse or isolated island, we do now live a short distance from the cliff top with views of the Isle of Wight. To make up for not actually living with a sea view we have a beach hut; only a six foot box, but it has the essentials; a Calor gas stove to make coffee, a changing hut for swimming and stacks of recycled paper for writing.

 With several career disasters and staying home when the children were young, I have notched up a variety of jobs and voluntary work; a wealth of interesting people and places to write about, I shall never run out of ideas.

Janet Gogerty

I have been writing frantically for nearly nine years and am writing my fifth novel, ‘At The Seaside Nobody Hears You Scream’. I still love writing short stories and have had them published on paper, in audio and in all corners of the internet. My novel ‘Brief Encounters of the Third Kind’ was originally a short story and eventually became a trilogy with ‘Three Ages of Man’ and ‘Lives of Anna Alsop’.

I love paper books and I’m sure they are here to stay, but in an uncertain publishing world, especially for new writers, I love the idea that we can just go ahead and be independent.

I started a clockwork website several years ago and it took on a life of its own. Visit to read about my books, my local area and my travels. There is an illustrated Beachwriter’s Blog, regular new fiction and a picture quiz. http://www.ccsidewriter.co.uk

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#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger Allison D. Reid @Allisondreid

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It’s nice to get back to our #FabulousFridayGuestBlogger posts, and I’m happy to introduce today’s guest, Allison  D. Reid. Hope you enjoy this post as much as I did, and please remember to share far and wide! (We’ll do the same for you, when it’s your turn!) Happy reading, and now, here’s Allison.


Have you ever fallen in love with a book character? Well, not literally, of course (though if you have, I promise not to judge). Sometimes we really connect with book characters, to the point where we wish they were real. We want to keep learning about them and follow their lives even after the story we’re reading has ended. For those of us who are writers, that connection can be pretty strong. Partly because our characters are in some way an outpouring of ourselves, but also because we have to work so hard to get behind their eyes…to feel what they feel, examine their thoughts, dreams, and motivations. We experience both their joy and their suffering, else we could not adequately express it to our readers.

Sometimes our characters surprise us, too. We expect them to go in one direction, yet they go off in another. The harder we try to rein them in to fit our vision, the more they fight us until we must either strip away their newfound will (which typically results in dull, lifeless characters), or give in and let them take the lead. Characters can take their writers on adventures too, and we end up places we never anticipated.

Such is the case with Einar from my book series. He did not exist anywhere in the back stories I had saved from my roleplaying days. He was a brand new character, dreamed up just for Journey to Aviad; written to serve the larger plot, and only intended to play a minor role. He was bitter and disillusioned, yet still retained a broken sense of honor. In my early notes for the book, Einar truly was a renegade, and not an especially predictable or trustworthy one. He would help Elowyn because it suited his purpose, but he would just as easily have sold her out if by doing so he could win his own cause. But that’s not where Einar ended up once the writing began, and I’m glad of it. Moment by moment, Einar showed me who he wanted to be, and who he was destined to become as the story unfolded. He showed me all his past scars, his present pain, and the silent inner hope he still managed to cling to in spite of all that. In the end, Einar became far more than just a cog in the wheel driving my plot forward. He became real.

I wasn’t surprised when Journey to Aviad readers kept asking me, “What happened to Einar? Is he coming back?” He made a connection with them too. And though for many reasons he couldn’t have a role in Ancient Voices, I desperately wanted to continue his story, not just for my sake, or to satisfy reader curiosity, but for his sake as well. He deserved more. So when I was asked to write a novella that could be included in a charity book (coming out next year), I saw it as my best opportunity. Into the Shadow Wood is that novella, and I’m incredibly excited that it has finally been released! Once again, Einar took me places through the writing process where I never intended him to go, and yet they suited him perfectly. Readers will be happy to know that Einar’s story has finally been given some closure, but it is far from over. He will be back again, and no doubt his journey will keep surprising me. I can’t wait to find out what happens next.

New Release Info and Blurb

Ever wonder what happened to Einar from Journey to Aviad? If so, you’re not alone. Readers asked, and I’ve answered—the wait is over! Plunge with Einar into the dark and twisted Shadow Wood (if you dare) as he fights for his life–and his sanity—in this companion book to the Wind Rider Chronicles. Haven’t read the series yet? That’s okay, because you can pick up the first book in the series, Journey to Aviad, FREE at most ebook retailers.

Into the Shadow Wood

Once a proud member of the Sovereign’s prestigious personal guard, Einar has lost everything: his home, his Sovereign, and his purpose. Most of his closest friends have either been killed in battle or executed. His friend Nevon died trying to fulfill a dangerous oath…one that Einar disagreed with, but now feels honor-bound to take up in his stead. The quest plunges Einar into the depths of the dark and twisted Shadow Wood, testing the limits of his strength, his beliefs, and his sanity. What he finds in the Wood is far more ominous than anything he’d expected. If he’s not careful, Nevon’s fate might end up being his own.

Allison D. Reid

Allison D. Reid was born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Her love for medieval fantasy was sparked by the Narnia Chronicles by C.S. Lewis, which fed both her imagination and her spiritual development. When at the age of thirteen her family moved to Germany, her passion for medieval history and legend only increased, and she found herself captivated by the ancient towns and castles of Europe.

Allison returned to the United States to study art and writing at Hampshire College in Amherst, MA. She earned her B.A. under the tutelage of the well-renowned and prolific writer Andrew Salkey, a student of her other great inspiration, and the father of fantasy, J. R. R. Tolkien. After graduating from Hampshire College, Allison moved to Connecticut. There she got the opportunity to attend seminary and further explore her faith before returning to her home state of Ohio.

Allison now lives in the Miami Valley area with her husband and children. She continues to work on her first published series while taking care of her family, editing for other independent writers, and managing a home business.

Find Allison Here:

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Amazon Author Page

Buy Links:

Amazon     Barnes and Noble     Smashwords    Kobo     Other

#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger – Carmen Stefanescu – Till Life Do Us Part

Since we haven’t had many #FabulousFridayGuestBloggers in the past few weeks, I was delighted to hear from Carmen, who has an interesting post to share with you today. Carmen, I welcome you to The  Write Stuff. It’s always good to hear from you.


Thank you, Marcia, for inviting me to celebrate my latest release on your blog, too!

As a part of Till Life do Us Part deals with past life regression, I want to share with your followers several interesting things I found while doing a thorough research for my story on this topic.

Past Life Regression Therapy is considered one of the fastest and most effective ways to help you transform your life experience. It is a pretty simple process : you are suggested to travel back through the years to recall specific memories. Conflicts from the past and the patterns resulting from traumatic experiences can distort our physical, emotional and mental well being. Some indications of unresolved past experiences: Irrational fears, unexplained and recurring physical pains or sensations, Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome, persistent feelings of panic, anger, guilt, depression, disturbing thoughts, feeling blocked, emotional outbursts, blocked feelings, low self-esteem, self-harm, numbness, repeating relationship problems with family, work or social contacts, repeating patterns of self sabotage, limiting habits. Continue reading

Calling All Bloggers & Writers: #FabulousFridayGuestBlogger Feature is Looking Pretty Boring!


If you happened to visit The Write Stuff Friday, you might have noticed there was NO guest blogger on the  premises. 😦 Normally, I fill in with something if no one is scheduled to visit with us, but I was utterly swamped with editing and other deadlines, and let it slip by. Sorry! However, I’m hoping that situation is about to change.

If you are a writer or blogger who would like to be featured as a Friday guest, please contact me. We’ll choose a date, and if you haven’t done this before, I’ll tell you how to go about it. If you HAVE done this before, and would like to do it again, we’ll welcome you with open arms. In addition to letting people learn more about you, it’s a great opportunity to direct traffic to your blog, or to the Buy Links for your books. And if you have a new book coming out (and some of you DO), or are having a special promo, you can mention that at the bottom of your post, too.

So, how about it? I’m waiting . . . . . . . . . . .


#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger @ThorneMoore

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Known Knowns and Unknown Unknowns

“Write about what you know” is useful advice. I thought it would be very easy to follow, when writing my latest book, The Unravelling, which will be published in July. First of all, I would be looking at the world as seen through the eyes of a 10-year-old, in the mid-1960s. She would be living in a town quite similar to Luton, on a council estate that was just beginning to replace the prefabs, which had been thrown up to provide quick emergency housing, after the war.

 I was a ten-year-old in the mid-1960s, living on the edge of a council estate in Luton, and, walking to school, I witnessed the demolition of the prefabs, including the one my grandparents had lived in. Simple.


Post war prefabs

It is remarkably easy to remember every little detail of my world, 50 years ago, from the cotton frocks our mothers made for us, to the pink custard served up at our seriously stodgy school meals. I remember the posters on the classroom walls, the smell of the corridors (a mixture, I suspect, of polish, vomit, urine and very strong disinfectant). I remember the streets, dark lanes and open parks I would walk through on my way, to and from school – a serious walk, but no one would have dreamed of being taken to school by car. I remember the shops, and the sweets they sold – sherbet flying saucers, fruit gums, penny chocolate bars. I remember the kitchen wallpaper my parents put up, as horizons began to expand, covered with exotic vegetables like aubergines (eggplants), courgettes (zucchini), chard and red peppers – vegetables we never saw in the shops, but rumour had it that foreign people ate them and may even had liked them.


The estate where I grew up. I watched the tower blocks go up as I walked to school.

So much for the 1960s. I then had to look at the turn of this century. The Millennium. Equally easy, I thought. Everyone knows some of the events that happened then, and others are easy to check. It was only 15 years ago, and I lived through it as a mature adult. Surely I can remember just how it was. Wrong. It is next to impossible for the memory to keep pace with the technological changes that are sweeping past us, establishing themselves so quickly and firmly that we can’t believe they haven’t been around for at least 30 years.

How did you search for someone, in 2000, as my heroine has to do? You use the internet, of course. Except that, in Britain, broadband connections only began in 2000, and nearly everyone was reliant on impossibly slow dial-up modems, with rocketing phone bills and shouts of fury from other people in the house who wanted to use the phone. Have I really only had proper access to the World Wide Web for 12 years? Then, finding someone today, you might try Facebook. But there was no Facebook. Or you could Google them. But back then, Google was a new boy on the block and everyone used Yahoo, or Alta Vista, and the chances were, you wouldn’t find anyone anyway. People didn’t have an on-line presence. You want to trace a marriage that happened 30 years ago? Today you do it with the click of a mouse. In 2000, you got on a train.

I used my own early researches into family history in my first book, A Time For Silence, in which my heroine tries to track down details of her grandfather and aunt. Now I know that today, you simply go to Ancestry.com or FreeBMD, and have it all at your fingertips in minutes. When I first started researching my family history, there was no internet, and searching meant getting on a train to London, to trawl through huge tomes of indexes. Not so bad, when I only lived 30 minutes from London. When I moved to Wales, I found that the National Library of Wales, in Aberystwyth, had similar records, and I spent many happy hours going blind, trying to decipher blurred microfiche and microfilm records. I gave my heroine the same pleasure.


My eyes hurt, just thinking about it

However much I use my own experiences to write, some research is nearly always needed. In A Time For Silence, I had to write about life in rural Wales in in the 1930s and 40s. Before my time, but there were plenty of people around me who could remember it well enough, and I was able to trawl through local newspapers of the time. That was so absorbing, I couldn’t resist letting my heroine do the same.

But the trick, with research, is to know how much of it not to use. It’s so tempting, when you become immersed in a fascinating topic, to want to filter it all into your story. A Time For Silence features a German prisoner of war, and I wanted to know more about the POW camp, which was set up a few miles from where I now live. I knew, as everyone round here knows, that it began as a camp for Italian prisoners, who decorated one of the Nissan huts as a Catholic Chapel, which had been preserved.

But after the surrender of Italy, the camp was used for German prisoners, many of whom worked on the local farms. I needed some basic facts for my story, such as when exactly the camp closed, and who was kept there, so I finished up appealing for any information about Henllan Camp from the National Archives. What I received was a huge collection of official inspection reports for the War Office, which give a riveting insight into army and bureaucratic behaviour.

The site remained open until the spring of 1947, and many of the German prisoners were rounded up and taken there after the war. The function of the camp was to assess how Nazified they were. They were allowed to apply for repatriation and then they were classified as white, grey and black Nazis. The white were simply Germans caught up in the war, with no ideological commitment, and could be allowed home. The grey were believers who were open to persuasion that they had been deceived, and could go home as soon as they were sufficiently re-educated. The black were committed Nazis, who would never be swayed in their beliefs. They were to be kept.

At regular intervals, the government sent inspectors to report on conditions in the camp, number of prisoners, state of discipline etc. This was obviously a box-ticking exercise. Each inspector reported that the camp was well run by its commander, accounts were properly kept, and order was smoothly maintained by a splendidly efficient sergeant major. Then, just before the camp closed, a new inspector arrived – one who was less of a box-ticking pen-pusher and more of a perceptive psychologist. His report explained that while the commander loftily fulfilled his duties, blithely unaware of any trouble, the sergeant major, who dealt personally with the prisoners, was a rabid German-hater, looking for revenge for his brother, who had been killed in North Africa, and he had been systematically destroying the prisoners’ written requests for repatriation.

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The Italian chapel at Henllan

 This was a great story, that I just had to use – but I didn’t, because it wouldn’t have been relevant to my story. The key to using research is to know which bits of it matter to my characters and to get details right, when they are needed, but to let the bulk of it lie beneath the surface, just out sight. And there’s always the possibility of another book that might put my research to deeper use.

Author Thorne Moore

Thorne Moore was born in Luton, near London and the sludge of the Thames estuary, and now lives in Pembrokeshire on the Atlantic coast, with a lot of hills (small, but we call them mountains), woods (we call them forests) and villages (other people would call them road junctions with a house or two). No cities anywhere near.

She was advised to study law, so she studied history instead, in order to avoid a future career as a lawyer, as she was obviously going to be a writer. Since it took her forty years to get published, she filled in the time working in a library, running a restaurant, teaching family history and making miniature furniture (Pear Tree Miniatures). Her first book, A Time For Silence, was published in 2012. Motherlove followed in 2015, and her third, The Unravelling, will be published July 2016. She lives in a Victorian farmhouse, which occupies the site of a Medieval mansion. Several cats share the house and several woodpeckers share the garden.

Mlcover     Timeforsilence

Motherlove (Amazon UK)
Motherlove (Amazon.com)

A Time For Silence (Amazon UK)
A Time For Silence (Amazon.com)

Thorne’s Amazon Page
: @ThorneMoore



#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger – Carmen Stefanescu

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Dragobete, the Romanian Valentine’s Day

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The Romanian equivalent of Valentine’s Day is called Dragobete. It dates back to Dacian times and is celebrated on February 24th.

Dragobete is the equivalent of Cupid, love’s god in Roman mythology, or Eros in Greek mythology. Dragobete, Youth God in Romanian Pantheon, nicknamed Spring Head, is celebrated, depending on the ethnographic area, on one of the days at the end of February or beginning of March. Continue reading

#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger – Shelley Wilson @ShelleyWilson72

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It’s Friday again, and time for another Fabulous Blogger. Our guest today is Young Adult author, Shelley Wilson, but she’s also a whole lot more than that. Shelley, thank you for visiting with us today!

Thank you so much to Marcia for inviting me over to her fabulous blog. I pondered for some time on the theme of my guest blogger piece, worrying when I realised that I talk nonsense ninety percent of the time.  However, I’ve been this way for many years so why change now!  

I did finally settle on a classic writing topic. It’s the theme many of us resonate with as we learn our craft – ‘write about what you know’.  It’s a valuable piece of advice, and it’s perfect if you are capturing a story about accountancy, project management or health, but what if you choose to write about travelling through space, or chasing a zombie ninja down Route 66?

Before I began writing full time, I ran a successful holistic health business. I spent my days offering reflexology sessions, Reiki healing, massage and a range of other alternative therapies.  The ‘day job’ came in very handy when I wrote my Wellbeing Workshop handbag guides. Meditation for Beginner’s and Vision Boarding for Beginner’s are based on the most popular personal development workshops that I run.  I am proud of these little guidebooks and very pleased that they continue to sell well on Amazon. 

Even though I work with alternative therapies, energy, angels and crystals, I don’t dance naked under the full moon or run through corn fields with flowers in my hair. I’m a down-to-earth girl who enjoys keeping it real.  If you don’t know a chakra from a chorizo, then I’m the author you want!

When I wrote, How I Changed My Life in a Year it was easy to see how this would fit into the Mind, Body, Spirit genre that was a huge part of my life.  The book followed my personal journey as I set myself twelve challenges, or dare I say it, New Year Resolutions.  The tasks included weight, fitness, creativity, gratitude, happiness and changing habits.  Goals that fit perfectly into the ‘write about what you know’ box.

One of my favourite challenges took place in November, a cold and bitter month where you can’t escape the Christmas hype but aren’t feeling the joy quite yet.  A month that is perfect for hibernation.  A month where over three-hundred-and-fifty-thousand people chain themselves to their laptop, computer or tablet and attempt to write a fifty-thousand-word novel in thirty days.  Yes, I’m talking about NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month). 

I tackled this particular challenge like an SAS mission, with detailed biographies of all my characters, and a rough outline of where I wanted to take the idea. This particular story was my young adult fantasy tale, Guardians of the Dead and included witches, demons and faeries – hang on, I don’t know anything about that!

When I ventured into fiction, and especially fantasy, I felt a sense of freedom that I never experienced writing self-help. I abandoned the rules as I got to create anything I wanted.  My fantasy realm still had some order to it, with a hierarchy of soldiers and geography that made sense to the reader, but the boiling rivers of lava and the hulking demons feeding on lava hogs were pure unadulterated imagination. 

It was thrilling to shake off the shackles and venture into the unknown. One of my favourite authors, Stephen King, added an interesting slant on the ‘write about what you know’ theme when he said: “Write what you like, then imbue it with life and make it unique by blending in your own personal knowledge of life, friendship, relationships, sex, and work.”

His words make perfect sense to me. I find it easy to use my work and personal life experiences to help others to feel better about themselves, or to find inspiration to be the best they can be.  By doing this, I can pour a ton of honesty, trust and love into my non-fiction titles.

With my fantasy work, I added these elements without really thinking about it. The make-believe adventure contains threads of my life, my work and my relationships. 

The heroine in my young adult trilogy is a sixteen-year-old supernatural oracle. She works with her energy field and uses her chakras* to feel for her powers.  Working with chakra energy was a huge part of my day job, and it felt right to add this element to my fantasy work.  My holistic clients were also able to resonate with this part of the book because they had heard me talking about this in their therapy sessions.  My fiction readers were able to learn something new without feeling like they were reading a self-help book.

“Write what you like, then imbue it with life and make it unique…” 

When I started writing I believed that it had to be one or the other – fiction or non-fiction – but over time I’ve realised that the line is blurred, and the two genres can blend perfectly.

Losing yourself in a fantasy book is one of the pieces of advice I give to my holistic clients as a way to switch off and relax. Channelling positive energy is the advice I gave my fictional heroine as she tackled a monumental challenge. 

I’m going to continue writing about what I know, but I’m also going to follow Mr King’s wise advice and make it unique. Hopefully, this means I will be creating a perfect blend of self-help and fantasy fiction for many years to come.

*A chakra is a wheel of energy within the body. We have seven main chakras, which align the spine, starting from the base of the spine through to the crown of the head.



Author Shelley Wilson

Shelley Wilson divides her writing time between motivational non-fiction for adults and the fantasy worlds of her young adult fiction. Shelley’s books combine lifestyle, motivation and self-help with a healthy dose of humour. She works in the Mind, Body, Spirit sector as a practitioner and tutor. Her approach to writing is to provide an uplifting insight into personal development and being the best you can be.

Shelley writes her Young Adult Fiction under ‘S.L Wilson’ and combines myth, legend and fairy tales with a side order of demonic chaos. You can check out all her books here: http://www.amazon.co.uk/-/e/B00G5KPMJI

She was born in Yorkshire but raised in the West Midlands, England. Don’t be fooled by the smile – she has a dark side and exercises her right to be mischievous on a regular basis. She is an obsessive list maker and social media addict.  Shelley would love to live in the Shire but fears her five foot ten inch height may cause problems.


The Second book of Shelley’s Young Adult trilogy is available from Friday 22nd January as an eBook or paperback, via Amazon.

Guardians of the Sky (Book 2)


Can one girl sacrifice herself to save the one she loves…

Following their daring escape from the demon realm, Amber and her friends become caught up in a war between good and evil.  They must join forces with the Queen’s warriors to overthrow a malevolent force that has spread across Avaveil, the land of the Fae.

As her powers grow, Amber is faced with the real possibility that she is a danger to the ones she loves.  Her full strength is yet to be tested in a way she can’t comprehend.

Dragons, faeries and humans stand side-by-side as they are drawn into a battle of cunning, magic and surprising revelations.  Can Amber survive long enough to see her dreams fulfilled?

#FabulousFridayGuestBlogger – Umm? #MarciaMeara ?

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Sorry to say, folks, but my guest blogger for today did not send me her post, so I’m left either skipping it, like I did when this happened last week, or being my OWN “guest.” I chose Plan B. Here is an updated blog post I wrote last year for “A Woman’s Wisdom.” (I would link to it for you, but I can’t get in to that blog anymore.) So, I’m just going to run it anew here, and hope you’ll enjoy my ramblings. This is exactly how it happened for me, and something I believe in with all my heart. Enjoy!

It’s Never Too Late

We’ve all heard the phrase, “It’s never too late.” But how many of us really believe it? I suspect most of us are convinced that the dreams we once had are things of the past, and the path we ended up taking in life has led us too far in a different direction to make any of them come true now? A show of hands, please. Thought so.

Well, I’m here to tell you it just ain’t so. It’s never too late to change course, to follow that long-deferred dream, to live the life you really want to live. (Oh, and you can put your hands down, now, thanks.) But listen closely, because what I’m going to tell you is the Truth. With a capital T. You can take it to the bank. Continue reading