Using The Five Senses: Sound

Once again, it’s time for the next installment of Joan Hall’s wonderful “Using the Five Senses” series on the Story Empire blog. Today, she’s focusing on Sound, and I hope you’ll stop by and check it out. You’ll be glad you did! Then, if you would, pass it along so others can enjoy as well, thanks. And thanks to Joan, as well, for this reminder of how important the use of sound is in our writing. 🙂 ❤

Story Empire

Hey, SE Readers. Joan with you today with the fourth in a series of posts about using the five senses in writing. Today’s post is about the sense of sound. If you missed the first three, you can read them by clicking the following links:

It’s been said, “Silence is golden.” In reality, sounds are everywhere. Even if you’re in a quiet house without the noise of a television or radio, there are still noises. The humming of a refrigerator. The whir from an air conditioner. We’ve become so accustomed to these sounds, we barely notice. But if your electricity fails, you’ll discover how quiet your house is.

Like with the other senses using sound, or in some cases the absence of, can help convey a character’s emotions.

In the song, “I Think I’d Rather Be a Cowboy,” singer/songwriter John Denver wrote a line that I’m envious…

View original post 427 more words

A Dozen Ways to Start a Story

Staci Troilo is back! Her hiatus is over and her first post on her return to Story Empire is superb! “A Dozen Ways to Start a Story” is filled with great tips on generating ideas for your stories. Trust me, you don’t want to miss this one, so head on over to check it out, and then pass it along so others can take a look as well. Thanks, and thanks, Staci, for so many helpful ways to jump start a new tale, or perk up an addition to a series. 🙂 ❤

Story Empire

Ciao, SEers. Wow, it’s been a while since I wrote that opening. For those of you who missed me, please know I’m sorry I was away so long. I missed you. For those of you new (or new since I took a sabbatical) to the site, I’m Staci, and you’ll come to recognize my posts by me signing on this way.

Before I continue, I really need to give a shout-out to my SE partners in crime colleagues, who went above and beyond covering for me in my absence. I couldn’t ask for a better blogging family. Mae, Joan, Craig, Harmony, P.H., Marcia… many, many thanks for all the support.

Now, back to one of my favorite topics. Not my kids (though I could talk about them forever). And not my dogs (and we all know I could ramble on equally long about my furry family members). Today, third time’s…

View original post 1,085 more words

Character Archetypes: The Trickster

If you’ve been following my reblogs of C. S. Boyack’s series on archetypes, you’ll really enjoy his Story Empire post today on Tricksters. What are they and how can writers use them to add surprising elements to their stories? Just head on over and check it out. You’ll be glad you did! Oh, and please don’t forget to share so others can learn more about archetypes, too. Thanks, and thanks to Craig for such an interesting and helpful post. 🙂 ❤

Story Empire

Hi gang, Craig with you today. This is post number five in the character archetypes series. In the Hero’s Journey, there are some common characters that are likely to show up in all stories. This doesn’t mean each archetype shows up in every story, and aside from the hero, the rest are kind of optional. Almost every story will have an assortment of them.

This series is to introduce you to them. Once you’re aware of them, you can decide if they can benefit the story you’re writing.

I have to say, this is the most maddening one to write about so far. Almost seems poetic when you consider it’s about The Trickster. There are as many different opinions about this archetype as there are websites, so I’m going to reject their reality and substitute my own. This is all in an attempt to offer some help, which is what…

View original post 754 more words

I’m at #StoryEmpire Today and I Hope You’ll Stop By!

As many of you know, I was invited to join the team over at Story Empire, and will now be posting there regularly (about twice a month). Happily, I scheduled several posts ahead, which is helpful while I’m still moving at a snail’s pace around here. And today, I’m beginning my Why Write Wrong? series over there, as a quick and easy way to understand frequently misused words and phrases. Hope you’ll stop by to say hi, and check out it out. I’ll be running this series on Story Empire every two or three posts, and hope it will be a helpful and fun way for folks to learn how to avoid some of these writing errors. I’ve posted a couple of these here over the years, but there are also a lot of new ones coming up. I see these things way too often lately, and I’ve been taking notes. 😀 

Hope to see you there, thanks! 

whywritewrong2

STORY EMPIRE “WHY WRITE WRONG?” POST

 

The Silver Lining from the COVID-19 Cloud

Please do yourself a favor, folks, and stop by Don Massenzio’s blog to read his post today. Hands down, this is the best post I’ve seen so far about the situation we are all struggling with right now. The poem Don shared is wonderful, and his thoughts on what we can learn from this experience are perfection. After having read this, I feel better than I’ve felt for a week! I hope it will uplift and inspire you as much as it did me, and that you’ll pass it along to everyone you know! I’m even thinking of making a copy to pin on my cork board so I’ll be reminded of these things when my spirits sink. Please share, thanks, and my heartfelt thanks to Don, too, for pointing out the silver lining! 🙂 ❤

Author Don Massenzio

As I write this, I’m sitting in my office beginning the fourth day of the isolation brought about by the COVID-19 (CoronaVirus) pandemic.

I work for a company where travel every week is the norm. Last week, as I sat in a corporate office in Chicago, we listened to our travel scenario gradually degrade from ‘travel as normal’ to ‘no meetings with over 25 people’ to ‘no travel to client offices’ to stay at home and work remotely.

As Monday came along, our highly technological company struggled with overworked meeting servers and the inability to dial in. The whole working world had moved to this model and the infrastructure was not ready.

Now, four days in, my perspective on the ‘inconvenience’ of the restrictions on travel and gathering are helping me form a different perspective on what’s happening in the world.

I know many are suffering from this virus, but…

View original post 444 more words

Book Review Tuesday: Grinders by C. S. Boyack

Though I’m still not feeling up to putting together my own posts yet, I figured today would be a good day to share a review from another site. Check out Mae Clair’s thoughts on Grinders, Craig Boyack’s latest release. Such an imaginative and entertaining tale! As soon as I gather up a bit more energy, I’ll be reviewing this one, myself. In the meantime, stop by to see what Mae has to say, and then head over to Amazon to grab your copy! You’ll be glad you did! Don’t forget to share, thanks, and thanks to Mae for a super post! 🙂 ❤

From the Pen of Mae Clair

Warm and cozy window seat with cushions and a opened book, light through vintage shutters, rustic style home decor. Small cat on window seat, along with coffee cup by pillow, Words Book Review Tuesday superimposed over imageHappy St. Patricks Day, everyone! Whether you’re Irish or not, ’tis a day for the wearing’ o’ the green, and a tip o’ the hat to the wee folk. Right now, we could all use a little luck given the state of the world in view of Covid-19. Whatever your corner of the planet, I hope you stay safe and well. If you’re stuck inside, it’s the perfect time to catch up on your reading.

With that in mind, let’s jump into this week’s book review!


Book cover for Grinders, a speculative fiction novel features neon lights and holographic images by C. S. BoyackJimi Cabot, and her partner Lou, are two cops assigned to the “Grinder Squad” in a futuristic San Francisco. Grinders are people who have their bodies altered through illegal surgeries which use computer chips to provide enhanced senses. Despite their department assignment, Jimi and Lou usually find their days eaten up by the drudgery of routine patrol and domestic disturbance calls—until they happen upon…

View original post 239 more words

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine – Weekly Round Up – March 8th – 14th 2020 – Elephant Ears, Crispy Chicken, Funny Girl, Music, Guests, Books and Humour

Another wonderful Weekly RoundUp post on Sally Cronin’s Smorgasbord blog. Do check it out, and don’t forget to watch a couple of the lovely videos, too. They will give you some lovely smiles to start your day. Hope you’ll pass this along to all your social media friends, too. Thanks, and thanks, Sally. You ROCK, as always! 🙂 ❤

Smorgasbord Blog Magazine

Welcome to the Smorgasbord weekly round up with posts that you might have missed.

A tough week for everyone and even more difficult if you have family and friends who might be in the middle of the worst infection rates of the Coronavirus pandemic. Whilst we have been used to being in an isolated environment and with only two of us to worry about, my heart goes out to young families coping with not only making sure they have food to put on the table and other essentials, but with the childcare dilemma that they have to manage.

I also think that the healthcare staff who are exposed to the virus on a daily basis and who are working extra shifts to care for those infected should be recognised as being angels. Many of them are being infected themselves, and being overworked and probably not taking care of themselves as…

View original post 638 more words

Week in Review

A very quick note to let you guys know Joan Hall has a fun Week in Review post this time around, featuring some tidbits about Friday the 13th, and links to some cool blog posts, too. Check it out. Thanks, and thanks, Joan! 🙂 ❤

Joan Hall

Hey, Everyone. Happy Friday the 13th! Thirteen is a number surrounded by superstition. While I come from a long line of superstitious people, I’m not one of them. I’ll purposely do things such as walk under a ladder, open an umbrella in the house, or cross a black cat’s path.

I have a cousin who claims she isn’t superstitious but “just cautious.” Once when I visited her, I made the mistake of placing a hat on the bed. She promptly removed it, saying it was “bad luck.” Another time when she visited us, she tipped the salt shaker, spilling some on the table. Immediately she sprinkled salt in her hand and threw it over her shoulder. On the floor, mind you! Ridiculous.

However, I do enjoy hearing the stories behind the superstitions. Oh and speaking of black cats (I’ve owned several in my lifetime) I haven’t posted a photo…

View original post 152 more words

Tips for Writing Action Scenes

Want to improve the action scenes in your writing? Mae Clair has some fantastic (and easily understood) tips on Story Empire today. Check out her great post, and then pass it along so others can enjoy it, too! Thanks, and thanks to Mae for sharing these terrific and helpful pointers! 🙂 ❤

Story Empire

Hi, SEers. You’re with Mae today for a look at writing action scenes. Of all the types of scenes that go into constructing a novel, I used to dread action the most. Not so much these days, but they’re still the scenes I tweak and re-tweak most during editing.

When writing an action scene, there are a few tips to keep in mind:

Use Short Sentences
Short sentences generally work best in action scenes. Keep your reader pumped up and immersed in the moment. Don’t leave them stumbling over a tangle of lengthy sentences. Intersperse longer sentences with dialogue and/or shorter sentences to propel the action forward.

dog running toward camera, with open mouth, all four paws in air above groundAvoid Weak Verbs
Actions scenes call for strong verbs. Avoid verbs that are overused (turned, pulled, looked, moved). A trick I use when I write action is to focus on the urgency of the moment. As an example, people don’t just turn or

View original post 446 more words

March Promote Your Book Party!

Author Charles French has a wonderful way to celebrate the month of March by self-promoting our books like crazy and helping each other get the word out. Stop by his blog, read the post, and then join the party! I did! Thank you, Charles, for such a fun, easy, and totally free way to promote our books and help others, too. 🙂

charles french words reading and writing

new-years-eve-1953253_960_720

(https://pixabay.com)

It is the beginning of a new month, of March, so let’s self-promote!  It is time to stand up and shout for your books! Come and join this party, and celebrate your writing. Do not be shy–you must be your own biggest promoter!

So, regardless of the genre, tell about your book.  Include where it can be found, and be proud of your writing! Then, so as many as possible can see this promotion for all, please reblog and tweet this post! Let us all help each other as much as possible!

Proclaim your book to the world!

And remember, always, keep writing!

GallowsHillFinalCoverEbookGallows Hill can be found here in ebook.

Gallows Hill in paperback can be found here.

An interview about Gallows Hill can be found here.

32570160

Please follow the following links to find my novel:

ebook

Print book

Thank you!

The book trailer:

Maledicus:Investigative Paranormal…

View original post 13 more words